Cambridge Marriage Trouble

Marriage looks wonderfully endearing to the single individual who has in no way married, and possibly to the divorced person who hankers for anything to arrest their longing for companionship or sexual release, but marriage for almost all of us is quite a tough perform at times. (And I can say this even as a representative of my wife!). We carry so a lot of ourselves into our marriages – which is each a great and a poor issue.

We bring in expectations of getting ‘met’ by our partners: that they will satisfy us sexually, not devote as well significantly income, not seek out to manage us, that they will want to invest time with us. We also bring in expectations of what our partners need to carry to us: their virtues of diligence and moderation and sanctity and kindness – to title just four. We are disappointed when they don’t measure up to our previously unconscious expectations – that have now turn into conscious due to our encroaching annoyance.

The question is How will you deal with Marriage Conflicts?

Relationship Problems Emotional Abuse

Having a healthy marital relationship means giving up ego and being resolved to solve your particular conflicts. You have to be committed to staying together and working it out. You also have to be objective and look at your relationship as an outsider, so you can see what the real problems may be.

Meaning, although the two of you might individually wonder “Exactly what solution will work for saving my marriage,” your partner, guilty or not, needful or not, may be too distracted by the physical and emotional “smoke” of a relationship gone sour, in order to take advantage of the best romance curing advice that exists.

Of course, I jumped to the occasion and asked the obvious question… “Who is Nikki? The one your husband Mike met 10 years ago or the Nikki he sees now?” She soon saw the difference between personality and character. Personality, (the nice Nikki) was revealed when things were new and smooth.

Nikki told me during a marriage conflict intervention, “The person my husband Mike now calls a “bitch” was never like that ten years ago.” “How would you describe the Nikki of ten years ago?” I asked her. “Sweet, pleasant, romantic, willing to go the extra mile, considerate and kind,” she said.

Keep your spouse’s “Love Tank” full, You and your spouse each have a certain action which hits the hot button of your spouse in showing your love for each other. It may be a gift, praise, physical touch, quality time together, praise and edification, or others. Like a fuel tank on your car, when it is empty the car stops performing.

Your motive is to relax and unwind but your wife may need you home to look after the children while she prepares dinner. Therefore, she expects you to understand her situation and come home immediately after work. The baby is crying, the twins are fighting and your oldest son is self-absorbed in playing computer games.

Love And Relationship Advice

How did that conflict start? It started with the unfulfilled expectation of your wife towards you. Now let me speak to the wife. You have a circle of lady friends that you are close to and spend time with. They often have social gatherings and naturally they invite you. You want to participate in these gatherings so that you don’t feel left out.

One thing almost no one knows about saving a marriage, is that conflict is good for your relationship. The one lesson I wish I had learned years ago is that conflict is an opportunity. It is one of the few ways to resolve differences, change people’s hearts rather than their circumstances, and bring two people closer together than they were before.

Be aware of your own body language and what it may be saying. Talk in a calm, respectful voice. Ranting and raving accomplishes nothing. Remember that a fair argument can enhance a marriage. Fight for your marriage, not to win.

Not talking, refusing to share or self-disclose, lying, keeping secrets. When I was in graduate school, one of my professors told of an architect who build a secret room in his home and did not tell his wife about it.

Allow each other the opportunity to talk freely and listen genuinely without preconceived notions or becoming defensive. Do not anticipate what your partner would say and start thinking of a reply. Hear your partner out completely. Cultivate an environment where expressing feelings to one another is a positive experience.

There are basically two reactions towards anything that displeases a person. Some people blow up. They may shout, scream, rant or rave and after they have done so, they cool down and return to normal. Others on the other hand, keep their anger or bitterness inside them by clamming up. They may display their displeasure in their faces or body language but they would not vocalize it or act on it there and then.

Conflict, even in the best marriages, is inevitable. For some couples it creates underlying unease in a relationship. For others, it causes major problems. How we deal with conflict leads to either a painful or pleasurable conclusion.

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This article addresses some things we know about relationships, what works and doesn’t work in relationships, and offers two alternatives for creating healthier marriages.

It is often heard that adopting an attitude of hope is almost impossible in the midst of the chaos of marriage problems and the heartache associated with it. If you feel that you are faced with this challenge, consider asking yourself a more empowering question, such as: “How can I adopt an attitude of hope regardless of the problems I am currently experiencing?”.

They can’t figure out what to do differently. Most of the time people don’t know how to successfully communicate and productively solve problems together. This is one reason why 75% of all new marriages end up either in separation or divorce, or unhappily staying wed.

Many people see conflict as something to avoid at all costs. Others are constantly engaging in conflict because they feel they must look out for number one and don’t know how to resolve conflict without a full blown battle. Sometimes, depending on the situation, you may avoid a fight; while at other times, you attack before you even have time to think about it.

There are usually two types of responses to conflict, fight or flight. But a third response is possible and it is the only proper response to bring resolution to your problems. I’ll talk about FIGHT first.

The important thing to understand about the Mid-Brain is that our emotions are not controlled by the conscious, intentional part of our brain (that’s coming next). The old saying, “Emotions have no brains”.

If you are already married, and are experiencing conflict that could have been avoided had a plan been laid out, remember that it’s never to late to put a plan together from that point on. Of course both parties will have to acknowledge and agree to this, and there has to be some level of trust still existent.

“You can’t, you might as well give up now!”, remember, keep asking yourself empowering questions, and if you find yourself asking dis-empowering questions, make it a habit to ask three empowering questions in return and in no time, you’ll be setting yourself for success.

What this typically leads to is one person usually getting their way or their needs met at the expense of the other person. While this may work for awhile, it eventually leads to bitterness and resentment.

I like to say that character is the “raw” self without the façade and the defense mechanisms we use to protect ourselves. Have you heard the statement: “We never though this person would do this?”.

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