Midlife Marriage Crisis Advocate

Marriage would seem wonderfully endearing to the single particular person who has by no means married, and possibly to the divorced person who hankers for one thing to arrest their longing for companionship or sexual release, but marriage for nearly all of us is quite a tough work at times. (And I can say this even as a representative of my wife!). We carry so much of ourselves into our marriages – which is the two a excellent and a poor point.

We bring in expectations of becoming ‘met’ by our partners: that they will satisfy us sexually, not spend also much income, not seek out to manage us, that they will want to devote time with us. We also deliver in expectations of what our partners ought to carry to us: their virtues of diligence and moderation and sanctity and kindness – to identify just four. We are disappointed when they don’t measure up to our previously unconscious expectations – that have now become aware due to our encroaching annoyance.

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Make a pact with your spouse. In overcoming marriage problems it is important to promise each other that you will both try your best to fix the problem in your marriage. Do whatever it takes to save the marriage and bring the relationship back on the right track.

I needed that 30 years ago not now” (The Old Brain does not distinguish between then and now). The Old Brain also does not say, “Sorry, wrong person. I needed that from my parents, not my partner” (The Old Brain constantly confuses parent and partner). When you get now what you needed then, the Old Brain says, “Yes, thank you.

Our sex life isn’t working any more! We almost never laugh or have fun with each other. Everything seems heavy. There is virtually no warmth, few hugs, no compliments or appreciations. Nothing seems to be working. If you were a marital therapist who understood about brain physiology, what you immediately know about this couple or these couples?.

All of those are great questions, but ones that can’t be answered easily. However, if you wait to marry until you know each other better you can avoid a divorce. Marriage conflicts that are experienced when you are only a couple who is engaged can be taken on differently. You won’t need to worry about the stigma of divorce hanging over your head.

Is true only in the sense that we cannot consciously choose to feel any given emotion at a certain time. Emotions “happen” while we are engaged in life. While they can be understood intelligently and rationally, they cannot be “turned on” by choice.

You and your spouse don’t meet the person who charmed each other’s friends, bought gifts for each other’s parents, and always smiled from ear to ear. This is usually the way we display ourselves when relating to others specially if we have “fallen in love.” It doesn’t mean we trick a person into believing something that is not true!.

Love And Relationship Advice

A great marriage is a gift. The gift needs to be nurtured and cared for to survive and thrive. Growing closer through conflict is an opportunity. Grasp it and continue to grow with your partner. Seek the knowledge of those who can help you move in the right direction, especially when you feel you are alone in your efforts.

Nikki told me during a marriage conflict intervention, “The person my husband Mike now calls a “bitch” was never like that ten years ago.” “How would you describe the Nikki of ten years ago?” I asked her. “Sweet, pleasant, romantic, willing to go the extra mile, considerate and kind,” she said.

Working and providing the income may be a way to show your partner that you love them. Some people feel loved when others do things for them, some when they hear it, others when they are touched and yet others when they see it written. Your partner may need to hear it from you.

The shock shouldn’t be that you experience any conflict, but rather that you actually get along!. Why Couples Argue?, The primary reason couples have disagreements and/or arguments is that living together forces people to face their differences – differences that can become sources of irritation – if not outright contention – over time.

For many of us, dealing with conflict in our marriage is not something we handle very well, especially with all the unsolicited advice we get from friends and family that leave you feeling alone and unsure what to do to save your marriage.

The Cortex (The Computer Brain), Finally we all have a cortex, the part of our brain that is conscious, intentional, rational, and choiceful. It is the cortex you are using now as you read this article. It is the part of us that can be self-aware, reflective, and self-observant. It is the part of our brain that allows us to communicate in complex languages and develop science, literature and art.

To maintain a strong marital bond then, the experts suggest that couples should take concrete steps to avoid conflicts that can come from the little stuff. One way is to talk things out while you have some private time with your partner. Remember that open communication is key to understanding and finding solutions to any marital issue and this should never be taken for granted.

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Therefore when something happens “now” that is similar to something that happened years ago as a child, the Old Brain (that controls emotion and reactivity) connects to the prior experience as information about the present event, but does not experience the old experience as “old.” The emotion that was present then is brought into the present experience and we experience the combined emotion of then and now.

Take some things personally. Sometimes you do need to hear what your spouse has to say. Don’t ignore important feedback your spouse is giving you. Honor Your Commitment – For the majority of us, when we got married, we took vows that said we would stay together through thick and thin, good times and bad, sickness and health, for richer or poorer….and we meant them.

Get to know your other half better to be able to understand his views and sentiments and avoid arguments moving forward. Every day is an opportunity to do that. It doesn’t mean that just because you’ve spent several years together before you got married, you already know each other very well and will let nature take its natural course in your marriage.

We have “built in” needs; needs with which we are born. These include air, water, food, and shelter. Other built in needs we have are for physical closeness and emotional openness; what we call “bonding.” Without the skills to confide openly and honestly, listen empathetically, and solve problems effectively in an environment of good will and trust, we are unable to bond successfully.

Too many spouses in a marriage demand their rights. And when these rights are not given, they get angry and continue to demand to have things their own way. Here is what I advise couples in general.

My general advice to all couples is to give up your individual rights for the sake of your spouse. That is the first step towards personal change. When your spouse can see the changes in you, he or she will begin to change, too. Then and only then can there be any hope of saving your marriage.

There are entire dating services structured around that idea. I believe though, that a better thing to focus on is learning healthy conflict resolution. The truth is that every relationship is going to find itself facing conflict at some point. If everyone simply decided to throw in the towel and quit the relationship, no marriage would last.

This miscommunication leads to misunderstanding which in turn leads to something going wrong. When something goes wrong, tensions arise which leads to confrontations, conflicts, arguments, quarrels and fights between the two of you. This brings me to the all-important key in saving your marriage.

Seek professional help. In overcoming marriage problems it is important to get all the help that you can get. Seeking professional help or reading books of experienced therapists and authors can be very helpful. There are people who are trained and experts in dealing with relationship and marriage conflicts.

This article addresses some things we know about relationships, what works and doesn’t work in relationships, and offers two alternatives for creating healthier marriages.

Look carefully at your role in the conflict. So often we will convince ourselves that it is the other person’s fault. We console and justify to ourselves that the conflict is 90 percent “their” fault. Begin by taking responsibility for the 10 percent of fault that is yours.

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